Madonnelle at Night

Little Madonnas

The ancient Romans venerated the Lares, tutelary spirits of the house, in the form of small statues (of men and women), put in high places. These spirits protected also the roads, and their statues were placed at road intersections. This practice is at the root of the very large number of sacred images which populated (and to some extent still populate) the streets of Rome. In 1853 a researcher, Alessandro Rufini, listed 2739 sacred images, the majority of which portrayed a Madonna (hence they are called Madonnelle = Little Madonnas).

Some of these images became associated with miraculous events and were moved inside a church (for example Madonna dell'Archetto). The majority of the images were positioned on the line marking the separation between the ground floor and the first floor. An alternative placement was between two windows of the first floor. The height protected the image from damage caused by the carriages and was consistent with the positioning of images inside churches or chapels. In many cases the images were placed at the corner of a building. Because very often an oil-lamp shed some light on the Madonnelle, they constituted for centuries the only public lighting available in Rome.
http://www.romeartlover.it/Madonne.html
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Rome, Italy
Photographer:
© Images that go BAM, Brent Alexander McTavish
Madonnelle at Night

Madonnelle at Night

Little Madonnas

The ancient Romans venerated the Lares, tutelary spirits of the house, in the form of small statues (of men and women), put in high places. These spirits protected also the roads, and their statues were placed at road intersections. This practice is at the root of the very large number of sacred images which populated (and to some extent still populate) the streets of Rome. In 1853 a researcher, Alessandro Rufini, listed 2739 sacred images, the majority of which portrayed a Madonna (hence they are called Madonnelle = Little Madonnas).

Some of these images became associated with miraculous events and were moved inside a church (for example Madonna dell'Archetto). The majority of the images were positioned on the line marking the separation between the ground floor and the first floor. An alternative placement was between two windows of the first floor. The height protected the image from damage caused by the carriages and was consistent with the positioning of images inside churches or chapels. In many cases the images were placed at the corner of a building. Because very often an oil-lamp shed some light on the Madonnelle, they constituted for centuries the only public lighting available in Rome.
http://www.romeartlover.it/Madonne.html
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Rome, Italy
Photographer:
© Images that go BAM, Brent Alexander McTavish