Karnak Temple

Karnak, located on the East Bank at Thebes, is one of Egypt’s largest surviving temple precincts. Founded in the Middle Kingdom, it had become Egypt’s principal religious center by the New Kingdom. It was devoted primarily to the god Amun, a local Theban god joined with the sun god Re to become king of the Egyptian pantheon. Kings from the Middle Kingdom through the Roman era dedicated architectural elements such as pylons (monumental gateways), courts, temples, and shrines to the precincts of the Theban triad: Amun, his consort Mut, their son Khonsu, and the war god Montu, creating the sprawling zone we see today.

The walls of the pylons, courts, and temples were extensively decorated; the reliefs here include depictions of cult activities, religious festivals, coronation ceremonies, and military campaigns.

Excavations at Karnak have yielded numerous examples of both royal and private statuary, the remains of votive images set up here in honor of the gods. Some of the most magnificent of these come from the Court of the Cachette, where salvage work in the early 20th century uncovered over 700 statues and statue fragments and more than 17,000 bronzes.

http://www.sca-egypt.org/eng/SITE_Karnak.htm
Ref:
Date:
Location:
East Bank, Luxor, Egypt
Photographer:
© Images that go BAM, Brent Alexander McTavish
Karnak Temple

Karnak Temple

Karnak, located on the East Bank at Thebes, is one of Egypt’s largest surviving temple precincts. Founded in the Middle Kingdom, it had become Egypt’s principal religious center by the New Kingdom. It was devoted primarily to the god Amun, a local Theban god joined with the sun god Re to become king of the Egyptian pantheon. Kings from the Middle Kingdom through the Roman era dedicated architectural elements such as pylons (monumental gateways), courts, temples, and shrines to the precincts of the Theban triad: Amun, his consort Mut, their son Khonsu, and the war god Montu, creating the sprawling zone we see today.

The walls of the pylons, courts, and temples were extensively decorated; the reliefs here include depictions of cult activities, religious festivals, coronation ceremonies, and military campaigns.

Excavations at Karnak have yielded numerous examples of both royal and private statuary, the remains of votive images set up here in honor of the gods. Some of the most magnificent of these come from the Court of the Cachette, where salvage work in the early 20th century uncovered over 700 statues and statue fragments and more than 17,000 bronzes.

http://www.sca-egypt.org/eng/SITE_Karnak.htm
Ref:
Date:
Location:
East Bank, Luxor, Egypt
Photographer:
© Images that go BAM, Brent Alexander McTavish